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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)
as the averages denied washington's gravitational pull, the dow gaining 60 points, s&p climbing .5%, nasdaq advancing .20%, we know when the president or the speaker of the house comes on the tube these days, the market is going to get hammered. sell, sell, sell, sell, sell, sell. even if it is just temporary. >> sell, sell, sell. >> the only thing you need to know is the time they're going to come on. if you could just blast out of some aggressive growth stocks or sell some s&p future us when see them walk to the podium, you could probably coin money! i'm surprised the president doesn't start his talks by saying, look, look, america, i'm about to send the s&p 500 down a percent with what i say. ou how about the speaker? suffice it to say we all have to keep one eye on washington and hope they don't poke it out with their endless failure to rise above partisanship. when we started this campaign, i'm sure a lot of people said don't worry, i'm sure they'll do it. today was like the worst day yet. the two parties hate each other. they really do. they personally hate each other. but how about t
just came back from washington and i got good news and bad news. the good news, they all want to rise above. the bad news, the republicans want to rise above tax increases and the democrats want to rise above spending cuts. you can see that investors want to rise above washington. but this morning rally, the averages got pulled down when harry reid said there probably won't be a deal in time for christmas. who's calling the tune? the nasdaq climbing 1.8%. apple rallied eleven and change. i hope this mini rally is happening because people have looked over the fiscal cliff and they weren't terrified by what they saw. i hope we will get by. i hope they don't mind government intervention in their portfolios. because they are not going away. i hope that because what i heard in washington today were two sides even though i can tell them that a deal would be done and there would be no vacation without legislation, we'd be in much better shape. i have to tell you, as encouraging as the market was this morning, the situation in washington is as discouraging. one after another i started with a
solid reasons to feel totally downbeat. first, i can't believe we're still focusing on this washington thing. for five years we've had to keep one eye on washington, one eye on wall street. i remember whole ten-year stretches i didn't care what was happening down there. at the moment, we can barely focus on anything but washington. the whole u.s. economy, your entire portfolio is hostage to two warring parties, demonstrating a level of partisanship that's been empirically measured to being the worst since 1860, the origins of the civil war. let's hope it doesn't take out that particular benchmark. we're witnessing a titanic struggle between those who are willing to rise above politics, and compromise to cut spending and increase taxes. yes, that's the actual compromise radical middle position as dave cote from honeywell says, and those who simply refuse to accept tax increases or entitlement cuts. given that the president's saying he campaigned and won on a platform of higher taxes for the wealthy and the republicans say they were elected because they pledged to behind the scenes power
on stock holders they are facing something like the debt ceiling debacle. if the armed camps in washington don't disarm and agree to talk to each other in a serious way, and not just the bluster sessions that seem to be happening daily these days, which reminds me, do you remember -- do you remember the debt ceiling nightmare last year? going to those horrendous talks last summer, everybody felt very confident that the president and congress weren't really at loggerheads. market was almost at its high. pretty good, vix low. then like now, we heard that the discord was only political posturing. the stock market forwarded ahead, and the complacency was thick and more people worried about missing a move up rather than talks break down and we might actually default. every time we heard meetings between the president and the speaker like tonight, we figured we would hear mission accomplished the very next day. but we didn't. things got rancorous. ugly stalemate. the market dropped. we got a deal, but only after, not before, we had that hideous sell-off. makes sense. remember how unruly congress
was happening down there. at the moment, we can barely focus on anything but washington. the whole u.s. economy, your entire portfolio is hostage to two warring parties, demonstrating a level of partisanship that's been measured to being the worst since 1860, the origins of the civil war. let's hope it doesn't take out that particular benchmark. we're witnessing the titanic struggle between those who are willing to rise above politics, and compromise to cut spending and increase taxes. yes, that's the actual compromise radical middle position as dave cote from honeywell says, and those who refuse to accept entitlement cuts. given that the president's saying he campaigned and won on a platform of higher taxes for the wealthy and the republicans say they were elected because they pledged to behind the scenes power broker grover norquist they would never raise taxes, it certainly seems that the impasse cannot be solved and we got to -- go over the cliff. not only do the hard liners refuse to rise above partisanship in order to avoid a government man-dated recession, which is what it's amounted to
to the most powerful impact of the republican party. norquist can't vote for one. memo to washington who people think there could be a deal easily, these republicans don't fear the wrath of speaker boehner like they do the whip of norquist. in two weeks' time, we'll have a dramatic tax increase. going over the cliff is the only way these norquist controlled republicans can spare the wrath of grover. which i believe having known grover for 35 years is indeed worth than the wrath of khan. so why bother to sell now? it's a pretty legitimate subsequent, can't it? now we rallied 7% from the november woes. and i believe we can keep selling off. not hard, but certainly a couple percent as more and more people recognize that we could be going over the cliff. even if this is why you shouldn't sell. pull back again. perhaps by getting the achievable goal by helping the middle class with tax breaks. remember, it isn't a cliff where you have a hard landing. more kind of a jump on to a trampoline, maybe like a deep swimming pool. there is a recovery that is almost a certainty, but it could be a vicio
? as with anything related to washington, there's no easy answer to why we didn't crash today. let me walk you through three different scenarios. gigantic sell-off is right around the corner. we'll get hit hard. it just hasn't happened yet. i got tons of e-mails last night from different theorists. it's just a matter of time. 11%. 15%. people say you ain't seen nothing yet. anything is possible. i wouldn't count on a sell-off. we deserve to sell-off 7% immediately upon initial failure of t.a.r.p. legislation because it was teetering on the abyss. we were on the verge of massive bank loans, atms that might not work because of hefty cash withdrawals. there's always a way to avoid a catastrophe which brings me to the second reason why we didn't collapse. with the debt ceiling deal we got last year, never forget politicians can always agree on something. something small. without any violation of principles. the politician that took no increase tax pledge governor norquist can't vote for one. don't ask him to. he can't vote for one even if the speaker of the house tried to cajole one for a tax incr
the budget. in other words, bernanke like so many of us has given up on washington's ability to govern, at least when it comes to the economy. he knows he's alone in trying to get people hired. he doesn't want to be blamed for what happens when we go over the cliff. he's actually more worried about those who don't have jobs than he is about those who do. put simply, the guy's got heart. he's not willing to check the heart at washington's door. all right. come on, this show's about making money, cramer. not a cardiology exam versus ben bernanke and the president and congress. it's the most valuable thing you can do to keep the bull market from running out of steam. as part of a long term analysis of the stock market that i've been working on pretty much every night knight at home, if needed to know one number, one piece of data to predict the market you would choose the unemployment rate. when the unemployment rate is going lower and jobs are being created, the positive signs. the congress of course is true, too. now, the problem at the moment isn't with the fed it's with the executive
cuts, higher taxes and pro-growth initiatives doesn't come into play anymore in washington. too many pledges, too much ideology. i l am part of the 2% that's going to have to pay more. i have the highest effective tax rate possible, 48% for a variety of reasons. but i am willing to pay more because i used to pay more at one time and i'm grateful for what this country has done for me. i know that those of us are lucky enough to have done well in this country have had a really good run and it's time to show gratefulness, even if we think the government may be profligate with our money. enough already! i want others to do well too. so don't get the idea -- i'm not against the next guy doing better. the idea is that the small business person that everyone claims to be looking out for and the middle class people everyone pledges to, they do need a chance. but here's what the polls are missing, we are seeing rumblings if washington would stop intruding and go away and agree to a sacrifice. i know some are saying the president's taking a hard line. and i was none too happy with the press co
each other. the clock is ticking in washington. ticking against a dealing. i think the two sides seem to hate each other more than ever. i don't now, it seems like the last 72 hours i was hoping it was going to get better and it seems like it got worse. i spent a ton of time this weekend hanging with old college chum, grover norquist. he's as certain as ever that republicans who have impure thoughts about violating his no new tax pledge will be targeted at the primary level by tea party members. i'm taking this masterful behind-the-scenes player at his word that he controls almost all the republicans. because almost all of them signed his oath. so a deal could be tough. plus i'm now calling for no vacation without legislation. no vacation without legislation. because the holidays are slated to begin in a couple of weeks. which doesn't give enough time to get the job done. so you have one side that ins t insisting on tax increases, and then you have the other side which has pledged no tax increases which assure those deal can occur. after all, even if the president offered heavy-duty
's hostage to washington these days. there's some trends that can trump the government, health and wellness maybe? breaking up is easy to do stories. better than expected retailers, in the end when it come to the fiscal cliff, to the longer we delay a deal or can't do a deal at all, it's worse for all the shareholders and the investors and the stock market. yes, a deal that does nothing, it simply keeps taxes where they are right now and doesn't cut entitlements, that's what everybody wants. does matter, believe he, i mean what's going to happen if we do nothing except keep things exacthe they are now, and just vote to undo the cliff. they'll downgrade the u.s. debt. but that's it. by the way, we have already proven through nine ways of sunday that -- when our credit rating got downgraded last summer. well, bonds went up in price and down in-year-old. -- in yield. so why not do nothing? why doesn't the president say we're just going to keep bonds the way they are. and we're not going to cut entitlements because we know if we don't cut taxes, the republicans will go along with their no tax p
to pull off that syntax, though. at this point i think we've got to assume that the washington people, they can't get it together. we've got to gird ourselves for a cliff, make sure that we understand what the dive will look like, and focus on things that are easier to gauge, namely earnings and remembering that if you get aggressive ahead of falling off the cliff you're just going to do poorly. so with that in mind here's your game plan for next week. kicking things off is general electric. okay? i think this is really important. why? because this is the most important talk about the whole -- give you the whole panoply here. and my charitable trust owns ge, and part of that is because we believe it's a terrific play on several huge international themes. energy, conversation, natural gas use, aerospace, health care for worldwide aging population. i expect ge to be very upbeat. i think jeff immelt's going to tell a good story. some of that's because the company just boosted its dividend by 12% today p. you don't do that if you're doing poorly. the meeting will be the most talked about
could do well over the next few months, even if the two sides in washington can't rise above politics and come up with a reasonable budget that has both spending cuts and tax increases and seems to be the case right now after the president's discouraging press conference, which suggested that no deal's imminent. and the white house is quietly saying talks have regressed. what about our failure to revisit what didn't happen, what didn't go wrong and the impact on the market? well, let's start with today's incredible news about general motors buying $5.5 billion worth of stock from the u.s. government's t.a.r.p. program. and it was at a price $2 above where gm traded yesterday. that's right. we, the people, got a better deal than we could've ever hoped for just the day before. gm most likely would have been liquidated, putting more than 1 million people out of work. if the federal government hadn't bailed it out. nobody likes a bailout. people don't like to use the phrase bailout and the government isn't going to be made whole in this investment. i'm saying that point-blank. that's beca
, i think there has been a change of heart in washington. the rancor seems to have cooled. perhaps as the new york times said today as the tragedy in connecticut has softened the times. maybe it takes something like this to get the congress and the president to work on things. there does seem to be a spirit of compromise now brewing. i'm not just talking about the end of the year, but any time. the president perhaps holding off raising taxes for those who make $200,000. especially when coupled about this rumored embrace about spending cuts. that could turn the fiscal cliff into a fiscal hop, skip and a jump that ends up in an exciting place. there are other forces at work today that show you the magnitude of what a deal could mean for our great country. the other forces? the transports, banks, u.s. treasury bonds and gold. first, you know i like to watch the transports as a measurement of economic activity. you know it has to be shipped somewhere to be sold. that is why i follow the transports so closely. when they are going up it means there is more commerce happening than thought
to washington, no vacation without legislation. we will be virtually monitoring airports to see which legislators are leaving town now that the vacation is supposed to begin. you know what? if we don't have a deal by this vacation, or a pledge not to go away, then the odds go to -- down to 50-50 that we'll get one before the end of the year. and then we may only get one when people look at their take-home play and have a collective bout of nausea from a recognition that there was a fiscal cliff all along and we were just pushed over it. that's how much your paycheck's going to shrink. here's the bottom line. let's hope for the best that our politicians move in the right direction. something we can see as early as sunday morning when they appear on the major political talk shows like "meet the press." but we'll be preparing for the worst. >> the house of pain! >> that our lawmakers go home for the holidays, meaning we will likely go over the cliff and nothing will be done about it until after taxpayers actually feel the real pain. let's go to r.w. in nevada, please. r.w. >> caller: jim
to make this market immune from more disappointment from washington. "mad money "will be right back. >>> coming up, shop until you drop? the holiday shopping season is in full swing, and the only thing more competitive than jockeying for a position in line is the cut-throw clash of retailers again retailer. tonight, jim cramer is helping you on a holiday edition. and something's brewing. alongside its coffee for year, could concerns about starbucks move into tea mean it's time to lay off the caffeine, or is this your chance to fill up your cup before these shares really get percolating? cramer's grinding through the facts. plus, rise above. while washington trades offers, cramer's keeping you one step ahead of the fiscal cliff fiasco. tonight, a read of the regionals from the ceo of citi national bank. find out if you should be making a deposit. all coming up on "mad money." >>> don't miss a second of "mad money." follow@jimcramer on twitter. have a question, tweet cramer, #madtweets. give us a call at 1-800-743-thchlt. >> announcer:. miss something? head to "mad money".cnbc.com. >>
there are deadlines, deadlines are met or there are consequences of the markets. in washington, apparently, deadlines come and go and there aren't any consequences? >> melissa, two things. one, i think that on the corporate side, largely companies want tax reform, but small businesses, conceivably much more at risk because of the cliff, their voice perhaps isn't being heard as well as at the ceo level. i'm worried at the smaller level, where the majority of the job creation occurs. that's really what concerns me, and i think on the cliff, the fact that -- the other point i wanted to make. the fact that neither side really is making any headwind. we've known about this for such a long time. it's just in credibly disconcerting. >> all right. joe, thank you for phoning in. we appreciate your analysis. tyler and michelle, joe makes a good point about the pain being felt. you are the job creators, and here we are. the impact most borne by them. >> well, i think that's true, and the real paralysis, the hostage quality of the whole debate over the past few months has been disconcerting. we've had so many pe
? >> caller: washington redskins booyah p rg3 nation stand up. >> dan snooid ser your owner. have you thought about that at all? >> caller: i have a quick question. >> sure. >> caller: when the market is overbought, should i go for the long-term? >> when it's overbought, my own rule is that plus five, if we're very overbought, hey, take a pass. another time will come. however, you can get started small and hope it comes back if you just can't resist. sam in ohio. sam. >> caller: hey, jim. big glass city booyah to you. >> loving it what's up? >> caller: i got a question. i've been looking at a couple utility stocks, going with preferred instead of the common shares. i wanted to get your opinion on -- >> no, come on, man, we want upside. a lot of these utilities should have to be fabulous growth stocks, particularly in a growth economy. let's just open them outride, we'll do just fine. of course i want you in in market for the long run. you can't beat those high streakly traders. give me a break. i want long-term investing but that does not mean buy and forget. for the long haul, do not throw o
for 98% of americans and raise the debt celling so we can at least for a year put washington in the rear-view mirror. wow, can you believe that? there'll be some spending cuts to apiece the republicans, too, once they've bothered to identify the cuts they actually want. as much as some may believe that there's no incentive to run partisanship, the dramatic rates of income these fiscal rates give to tens of millions of americans who happen to be voters. of the 2 million jobs that could be lost, 1 million of them will most likely comes from the defense sector. at a time when china is rising. you see those planes land on that aircraft carrier this week? the middle east is boiling. i don't know. did we really want that big defense budget cut? i mean, maybe nothing more than the decline in spending is the war in afghanistan winds down. saving about half a trillion dollars over the time. maybe more. the areas where the defense job losses take place they look mighty red to me, at least on the electoral map. yes, you'll have to say goodbye to the fabulous 15% dividend rates and the capital gains
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)

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